CBC High School
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Course Offerings General Studies Departments
ACT Prep
Introduction to Philosophy
General Studies courses are not currently a part of the curriculum of a particular department. However, students may register for any of the courses listed in General Studies as a means to fulfill their 26-credit graduation requirement during their four years at CBC.
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ACT PREP
Course Information
College Prep 1 Semester .5 Credit
Prerequisites: Sophomores in the Honors Program , Juniors, and Seniors
Course Description: This course provides college-bound students with an opportunity to prepare for college entrance tests. This course will focus on the ACT and is designed for Juniors and Seniors who want to develop a familiarity with the ACT, gain strategies in testing, and/or who want to raise their scores.  The class will be comprised of four parts: English, Math, Reading, and Science.  Students will learn strategies to better attack this test and will review basic concepts of each subject.
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INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
Course Information
Honors / A.P. 1 Semester .5 Credit
Prerequisites: Open to Seniors; Teacher approval
Course Description: This course is an introduction to the philosophical thought of the ancient Greeks and, in particular, Plato and Aristotle. The course will begin by examining the earliest Presocratic philosophers and the themes that unite them. Attention will then be given to Socrates, not only for his philosophical innovations, but also as a model of what the philosopher and the philosophical life is about. Our treatment of Socrates will conclude with the question of why he is unable to provide definitive answers to the questions he raises. Plato’s theory of Forms will then be introduced as a way to try to solve this problem. Along with our discussion of the Forms, we will discuss the broader issue of absolute truth versus relativism and nominalism that confronted Plato and still continues to confront us today. After Plato, we will move on to Aristotle, focusing on how his philosophy should be understood as a response to Plato and to the Presocratics. Students will be shown how the natural philosophy of Aristotle is important to him and is closely related to his other philosophical interests of logic and ethics. Following this, we will take a diversion from our historical survey and look topically at ethics in order to see how the ancients answered questions about what is good, noble, just, and right. The course will conclude with a discussion of the merits of philosophy today.

Students are eligible for college credit through Saint Louis University.
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